Last week, Trump went against the will of the American people when he withdrew from the Paris Agreement. The majority of American voters, thousands of leading businesses, and even leaders of his own party, supported U.S. participation in the deal. But Trump withdrew anyway, marking an attack on our security, our public health, our economic prosperity, and our planet.

If there is any bright spot to be found in this devastating decision, it’s the fact that people are not accepting Trump’s decision silently. The list of cities and states committing to upholding the deal just keeps growing. And governors, mayors, businesses, investors, and universities across the country have started collaborating as never before to work toward the goals of the Paris Agreement. They’re still in, and we are too.

That’s why, together with our progressive allies we are launching the I Am Still In campaign to show that, with or without Trump, the American people will continue to support climate action to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement.

ACTION OF THE DAY

#IAmStillIn. Go to IAmStillIn.org to sign the petition supporting climate action and find out what else you can do to reduce your own carbon footprint to help reach the goals of the Paris Agreement.

WHAT’S TRENDING

TRAVEL BAN! Trump’s first response to Saturday’s horrific terrorist attack in London, was to use the incident to justify the need for his Muslim Ban. And one tweet wasn’t enough. This morning, Trump said, “People, the lawyers and the courts can call it whatever they want, but I am calling it what we need and what it is, a TRAVEL BAN.” He also criticized his own Justice Department for taking the “watered down, politically correct” version of the ban to the Supreme Court. To be clear: any version of a Muslim ban is unconstitutional. And any version of Trump’s “travel ban” would betray America’s foundation as a country of immigrants and would do nothing to keep us safe. And given that the Administration has repeatedly try to claim that this is not a ban, Trump is only further jeopardizing his case. As the ACLU points out, Trump both “confirmed the ban is a BAN” and “noted Muslim ban 2. is a ‘watered down, politically correct version’ of original.”

Infrastructure week. One of Trump’s key campaign promises was to rebuild America’s crumbling infrastructure. So far, he has done nothing to actually follow through on that promise: His infrastructure outline released late last year was deeply flawed and his recent budget actually cut vital infrastructure programs. But this week, dubbed “infrastructure week,” the administration plans to make some big announcements. First up? Trump will unveil his plan to privatize the air-traffic control system today.

Comey. We haven’t heard the last from him. He is expected to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee this Thursday at 10 am ET. Here are five things to expect from the testimony and here’s a refresher on why we need an independent commission to get to the bottom of Trump’s Russia ties.

Stress. Since Trump took office, Andrea Fuller, a Colorado mother has lived in a constant state of stress wondering whether she and her children will remain insured. “The possibility that I could lose my insurance looms over me like a death sentence,” she writes. Read her full story here.

#NoCutsNoCaps. Trumpcare would cut more than $800 million from Medicaid over the next 10 years, which would devastate Medicaid-funded services that low-income children and families, seniors, and people with disabilities need to live, work and participate in their communities. Tomorrow, join the Don’t Cap My Care rally at the capitol and a national day of action to save Medicaid.

UNDER THE RADAR

Monumental Monday. Donald Trump has launched an attack on America’s National Parks and Monuments. Make your voice heard by telling him to leave your national monuments alone! Submit your comment here.

GOOD NEWS

Glass ceiling. Wonder Woman director Patty Jenkins just smashed one. Wonder Woman earned $100.5 million in its opening weekend, marking the largest U.S. opening for a female director—and in perhaps the most male-dominated of genres.