Center for American Progress Action

RELEASE: Massachusetts Voters More Likely to Support Candidates Who Emphasize Women’s Economic Security, Survey Finds
Press Release

RELEASE: Massachusetts Voters More Likely to Support Candidates Who Emphasize Women’s Economic Security, Survey Finds

Poll also finds Massachusetts voters strongly support paid sick days

Washington, D.C. — Last week, Massachusetts became the third U.S. state to guarantee paid sick days for workers, with 60 percent of voters supporting a ballot initiative offering access to paid sick days. A new poll released today finds that voters across gender, racial demographics, and age ranges supported the ballot initiative, commonly referred to as Question 4. The survey also found that Massachusetts voters were more likely to support candidates who emphasized women’s economic security issues.

The poll—conducted by Public Policy Polling and commissioned by the Center for American Progress Action Fund—found broad support for policies that promote women’s economic security. Among its key findings, the poll shows that both Massachusetts men and women overwhelmingly supported paid sick days, with 57 percent of men supporting paid sick days, compared to 37 percent of men who opposed it, and 65 percent of women supporting paid sick days, compared to only 24 percent of women who opposed it. Overall, support for paid sick days among Massachusetts voters enjoyed a 31 percentage point advantage over those who opposed paid sick days.

Meanwhile, candidates who emphasized women’s economic security also enjoyed broad support, with 46 percent of Massachusetts voters stating they were more likely to support such candidates compared to 25 percent who said they were less likely—a 21 percentage point gap.

“Regardless of party affiliation, gender, race, or age, Massachusetts voters across the spectrum understand that candidates and policies that promote women’s economic security help all working families get ahead,” said Allison Zelman, Managing Director of the Women’s Initiative at the Center for American Progress Action Fund. “Access to paid sick days is not a women’s issue; it is a working families’ issue, and voters in Massachusetts strongly back policies that provide workers with the support needed to care for themselves or sick family members.”

The poll also finds:

  • Voters across age ranges are more likely to vote for candidates who emphasize women’s economic security: Massachusetts voters across the age spectrum expressed support for candidates who emphasized women’s economic security. Most notably, 61 percent of voters ages 18 to 29 said they were more likely to support such candidates, a 44 percentage point advantage over voters ages 18 to 29 who said they are less likely to support these candidates.
  • Voters across racial demographics strongly support candidates who emphasize women’s economic security: 64 percent of African American voters said they were more likely to support candidates who emphasized women’s economic security, while 63 percent of Hispanics stated they were more likely to support such candidates. Meanwhile, 44 percent of white voters said they were more likely to support these candidates, compared to 24 percent who said they were less likely—a 20 percentage point gap.
  • Support for paid sick leave across racial demographics: Voters across racial groups expressed strong support for paid sick days, with 71 percent of African Americans, 70 percent of Hispanics, 60 percent of whites, and 54 percent who identified as a race not listed in the poll expressing support.

The poll results can be viewed here.

For more information or to speak to an expert, contact Chelsea Kiene at ckiene@americanprogressaction.org.

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