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Events Archive

A Transatlantic Policy Conversation on Global Food Security

U.S. and European policymakers are increasingly focused on food security—alongside the related challenges of climate change, environmental deterioration, and water management—as key concerns for development and global governance. The interplay of these trends has been visible in the upheavals across the Middle East, as riots over the prices of staple foods and water disputes have illuminated the region’s extreme food insecurity. As the effects of climate change affect harvests in the decades to come, it is reasonable to expect that the knock-on effects of these disruptions will be magnified.

November 23, 2015, 12:00pm ET - 1:30pm ET

Why DACA Works and DAPA Matters: 1 Year After the President’s Executive Action Announcement

On November 20, 2014, the president announced a series of executive actions designed to improve our broken immigration system consistent with existing law. The most prominent actions involved the expansion of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, and the creation of Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents, or DAPA. Together with the original DACA initiative, these two efforts could extend temporary protection from deportation and work authorization to 5 million unauthorized immigrants.

Please join the Center for American Progress for a panel discussion with key leaders and analysts on where we are with DACA and DAPA one year after the announcement. We’ll discuss the positive impact of the 2012 DACA policy, the state of play with regard to the lawsuit blocking implementation of DAPA and expanded DACA, and why implementation of these policies is urgently needed for our society and economy. We’ll also discuss a new report that identifies the potential electoral impact of U.S. citizen family members of DAPA-eligible people, or DAPA-affected voters.

November 19, 2015, 9:30am ET - 10:30am ET

‘3 1/2 Minutes, Ten Bullets’

“3 ½ Minutes, Ten Bullets” tells the story of the murder of Jordan Davis, the trials of his murderer, and the aftermath of yet another incident of racial bias and gun violence in America. It explores the dangerous impact of “stand your ground” laws and gives voice to the devastating effect of gun violence on families and communities across the United States.

Please join the Center for American Progress’ Reel Progress for a screening of this film followed by a panel discussion with the parents of Jordan Davis, Lucia McBath and Ron Davis.

November 18, 2015, 6:30pm ET - 9:00pm ET

Putting Child Care and Pre-K ‘Within Reach’

As millions of families continue to struggle with the skyrocketing high cost of child care and pre-K in the United States, early education issues must be be elevated in the national debate for the betterment of kids, families, and the economy. In the two years since President Barack Obama announced a proposal to expand preschool, early childhood policy has gained momentum, translating into important additional federal investments and numerous state and local initiatives. Next week, the Center for American Progress will launch "Within Reach", a new campaign to continue this momentum and emphasize the need for affordable high-quality child care and early childhood education for American families.

November 17, 2015, 10:30am ET - 12:00pm ET

A Stronger Economy Through Stronger Environmental Safety Standards

This November marks the 25th anniversary of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The 1990 amendments ushered in a new era of protections from car pollution, toxic air pollutants, urban smog and acid rain. The amendments also established a national program to phase out and prevent release of chemicals that harm the stratospheric ozone layer. Not only were these changes sweeping, but they were also bipartisan. A Democratic-majority Congress passed the amendments, which were signed by Republican President George H.W. Bush.

November 16, 2015, 10:00am ET - 11:30am ET

Global Millennial Engagement: From Dialogue to Action

The Millennial generation is shifting conventional wisdom on political engagement. While young people are more skeptical of institutions and less likely to identify with political parties, they are also more progressive then previous generations. What does this reality mean for political organizing as we know it? How do U.S. Millennials compare with their peers around the world? And how will they shape politics and policy in the decades to come?

Generation Progress, in partnership with Foundation for European Progressive Studies and AudienceNet, recently commissioned a groundbreaking new study called the Millennial Dialogue Project. This research on cultural norms, political engagement, and social change has now been conducted in over a dozen countries and will be presented by leading experts.

November 13, 2015, 10:00am ET - 11:30am ET

A Conversation with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

On November 10, the Center for American Progress will host a moderated conversation with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and CAP President Neera Tanden. They will discuss a range of issues, including Iran, Israeli-Palestinian relations, and regional concerns, as well as ways to strengthen the partnership between Israel and the United States.

November 10, 2015, 3:00pm ET - 4:00pm ET

‘We the People: The Market Basket Effect’

"We the People: The Market Basket Effect" traces the events that led 25,000 employees and 2 million customers across New England to stand behind embattled CEO Arthur T. Demoulas and wrest control of a multibillion dollar grocery empire from an activist board of directors led by Artie T.’s cousin, Arthur S. Demoulas.

November 9, 2015, 6:30pm ET - 9:00pm ET

Reflecting Our Country’s Growing Diversity in America’s National Parks

The upcoming celebrations of the centennial of America’s national park system in 2016 provide an opportunity to reflect on how to ensure that current and future generations remain connected with the parks and monuments that help define us as a people. How do we build a system of national parks and monuments that reflects the diversity of America’s history, people, and cultures? How can preserving these places help tell all of America’s story?

November 5, 2015, 1:30pm ET - 3:00pm ET

How Can States Effectively Hold Schools and Districts Accountable for Improving Student Outcomes?

Over the past four years, states were given more autonomy to design and implement systems to track whether their schools are providing a quality education for their students under the U.S. Department of Education’s No Child Left Behind waiver process. Join the Center for American Progress and the Council of Chief State School Officers for a panel exploring how states are currently operating these accountability systems and discussing effective strategies for ensuring schools are serving all students well and promoting improvement.

November 3, 2015, 12:30pm ET - 2:00pm ET

Blood, Oil, and Cash: Confronting Terror Finance in Today’s Middle East

In the years since 9/11, the United States has built effective tools to disrupt funding for Al Qaeda. More than a decade later, however, new threats have emerged in the Middle East that operate on different funding models. The rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham and similar groups that extract resources from the land and people they control challenges the existing policy framework that focuses on safeguarding the formal international financial system. Meanwhile, Iran continues to destabilize the region through direct support to proxy groups such as Hezbollah. Although key U.S. partners in the region have taken action to crack down on terror financing, others have yet to take the necessary steps to counter terrorist fundraising in their own borders.

November 2, 2015, 10:00am ET - 11:30am ET

Forging a New Path: How Tax Reform Could Address the Coming Retirement Crisis

American families face a growing retirement crisis. More than half of all working-age households are in danger of having to make severe and painful cuts to their standard of living as they grow old. Basically, American families need more and more money for retirement, while their savings have actually remained flat or even declined. People live longer and health care costs are rising faster than inflation. But, unstable jobs, uncertain financial markets and employers cutting back on offering retirement benefits for employees make it more difficult to save for retirement. No wonder then that the retirement crisis is getting worse.

October 30, 2015, 9:30am ET - 12:15pm ET

Human Space Exploration: The Next Steps

Both NASA and private companies are putting in place many of the capabilities needed to send humans to Mars. But as the Center for American Progress noted last June at an event to honor astronaut Ed White’s historic spacewalk, the United States is building consensus on the future of its human spaceflight program—where we will go, how we will get there, and who will come with us. Slowly but surely, that consensus is emerging—with a focus on Mars as America’s horizon goal.

October 28, 2015, 10:00am ET - 11:00am ET

Mr. Smith Goes to Prison: A Former Missouri State Senator’s Reflections on His Time Behind Bars

In 2009, Missouri State Sen. Jeff Smith lied to the federal government about seemingly minor campaign misconduct and found himself serving a year and a day in Kentucky’s Manchester Federal Correctional Institution.Mr. Smith Goes to Prison is the story of his time in federal prison—the people he met, the things he learned, and the perspective he gained on the nation's broken criminal justice system while on the inside of the prison-industrial complex. Smith offers concrete solutions to end the nation’s decades-long failed experiment with mass incarceration and to facilitate successful rehabilitation for the millions of Americans living behind bars.

October 27, 2015, 10:00am ET - 11:00am ET

Rep. Butterfield on Judicial Elections and Diversity on the Bench

Please join the Center for American Progress for a discussion of diversity on the bench and obstacles that judges of color face in judicial elections.

The panel will include discussion of a report from CAP's Legal Progress that examines the success rates of all incumbent justices running for reelection since 2000. White incumbents had a 90 percent reelection rate, compared to 80 percent for black justices. Latino justices had a mere 66 percent reelection rate. These disparities raise alarming questions about how judicial elections impact diversity on the bench. In many states, diverse justices were appointed to the bench, only to lose their seat in the next election. The report advocates reforms that could help foster diversity on the bench, such as public financing for judicial campaigns and programs that would expand the pipeline of diverse lawyers who could become judges.

October 26, 2015, 12:00pm ET - 1:30pm ET